Where was your Instructor last week? Back at Soma Bay on the Red Sea for an intensive week of training and learning (and eating and swimming and sleeping and [fill in envious thought here]). But it doesn’t look too intensive in the photo, does it? That’s because the hotel management asked if we would like to take part in an initiative to help UNICEF by sponsoring a tree.

We have been coming to Egypt for training for a number of years now. The dry heat, guaranteed weather, stunning night skies and beautiful landscapes make training both a physical challenge and a mental joy. “Perception of effort” takes on a new meaning doing early morning sprints up 30-metre sand dunes. Read More

Chief Instructor Dennis Ngo has seen many many people start their training and then falter, or take a break and then try to restart.  In this article he explores the mechanisms at work in those first few weeks.  It’s a familiar scenario….you are in class – everyone is doing the same drill. The count goes on and on. How did you get here? Tried a class? Tick. Joined up? Tick. Set aside which day(s) for training? Tick. In uniform? Tick. Feel like you are about to die on the spot? Tick. Think that you would be grateful if you did? Hmmm.

“Your body is the current end point of millions of years of evolution plus a few decades of what you’ve done to it.  And of what you haven’t done.  Even of what you think you’ve done.  And now you’re in class because Evolution called out to you; “Those muscles and tendons and bones are there for a reason.  Get out of your head and into your body.”  You answered the call, rang up your local Fujian White Crane Kung Fu Instructor and here you are, wishing that Evolution had just left you alone.  If it’s a really tough class you’re making up sarcastic responses in case Evolution calls again. Read More

Congratulations! Your child is training at the best Martial Arts classes on the planet, with the Fujian White Crane Kung Fu Club. Is that enough to keep them coming? Let’s ask Richard Wagstaff, FWC Instructor for London South. His very popular children’s classes include many in the 5-10 years age group and he knows what it is like when parents hear:

“I don’t want to go to Kung Fu today” “But I thought you loved it?” “I do, but I feel sick today, my tummy hurts” or “I’m tired, can’t I just miss this week?”

Are they coming down with something?  So you send a text to the Instructor explaining that they are not coming today and then the same thing happens next week. Do they love Kung Fu or is this just another activity they started and want to give up? Children don’t have as many excuses open to them as adults (“Sorry, working late to meet a deadline”) and they don’t always know why they want to give up.

Sometimes they don’t want to give up at all – they really want to know how to carry on.
But young children don’t know how to say that.

Let’s see if we can help them.

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All Members of FWC are invited to the Chinese New Year Celebratory Dinner. Friends and family are welcome to join us in celebrating at the famous Joy King Lau Restaurant in London’s Chinatown.

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It’s amazing what you can do with 2 shirts.  At the FWC Club Christmas Dinner we raffled a cycling shirt and a children’s funky t-shirt.  This raised £438 for Aspyre Africa.  Co-founder Savina Geerinckx who trains at FWC Covent Garden & West End with Chief Instructor Dennis Ngo has sent an update on how the organisation has used the funds to buy “The Tools of Peace”. Read More

Xin Nian Kuai Le! Happy New Year!  Gong Xi Fa Cai! Wishing You Prosperity in the Coming Year!

Welcome to the Year of the Monkey!  Have to make lots of noise to bring good luck, hence all the exclamation marks!!! Read More

It’s not exercise but resisting gravity that gives us big muscles. That’s why astronauts can’t punch their way out of a paper bag when they land back on earth¹.  After a few recent adventures with FWC Hammersmith Instructor Adam Prout, I started to hear, “Ask Adam to do more crazy stuff”. Now, dear students, that is somewhat missing the point.  Adam is not a Crash Test Dummy, he’s a Kung Fu Instructor. Nor is he (totally) reckless. But he loves a challenge. And Britain has an astronaut in space. Let’s put Adam to the test again. Read More

Wise words from Chief Instructor, Dennis Ngo, on being ready for competition. Challenges come in all forms – standing up first in class after 100 sit-ups, making it to class at all on especially tough days, saying the name of your pattern during a grading (in Mandarin), folding your trousers properly, the list goes on and on. But, as Dennis says, “competitions are where the pressure is really on – a chance to find out what you are made of as you stand up alone in front of everyone to give it your best and submit to being judged.  The preparation is most important.  First you take yourself apart – then you train and train and train.  Then you go out and show what you are made of. Winning, not winning, that is merely a by-product of stepping on the mat.” So he didn’t mean taking your opponent apart then? Read More

There are as many reasons for starting martial arts as there are people. If you are thinking of giving it a go then walking into that first class can be daunting. Courage my friend, take that first step and never look back – you have nothing to fear but fear itself. But isn’t the Instructor going to be scary /terrifying/ immortal?

Chief Instructor Dennis Ngo (6th Dan but still mortal) talks about why he takes on beginners in his classes. What’s in it for them? What’s in it for him?

“I have been teaching for more that 35 years.  Although I am approaching 65 I have no plans to stop teaching, and I certainly have no plans to stop training.  I am on a lifelong journey of learning and improvement – I may never achieve perfection but I’m going to die trying.  Given that some of my students have now been training for over 30 years themselves, why do I still say “Beginners Welcome”?  Do I really mean it? Read More

Earthbound beings that we are, our hinge-like joints and large leg muscles allow us to defy gravity and reach new heights. In theory. Once we leave childhood behind, most of us stick to the earth as though it is a mark of adulthood.  But among us there are secret jumpers, people who try to rediscover the joy of transient weightlessness.

Here is one of them.

“A confession.

Er, hi.

My name is Dave, and I’m forty-four. And a quarter. Read More